The TerraNova Blog

The need for (more) speed

During  several of my days off this winter, I've been up snowboarding in the local mountains.  It's been a pretty good winter for snow, and often there's some crew from Terra Nova that are hot for joining in (special props to Trent, Clark, Christy, Liz, Austin J, and of course  the fam--Dana, Tyler, Austin, and Caleb).  I have this friend who I like to ride with that's really into gadgets. You know that guy--the one with the high tech helmet mounted camera, the electric climate controlled hand mittens, etc.  And he's also get this feature on his cell phone that actually clocks how fast he's going.  At the bottom of the run, it's not uncommon for him to shout out "I got up to 42 mph."  It's pretty fun to ride with him, because for his need for speed.

And then I heard a story this week that is a "speed" story. It's  about Wycliffe Bible Translators (WBT), the group that focuses on getting the bible translated into all the languages of the world.

 

Ten years ago, WBT realized that at the current rate that they were translating Scripture, it would take  over 150 years for them to begin a translation project in all of the language groups that needed a translation.  They decided this was not acceptable.  So they went about the task of evaluating everything they did in order to see how they could get a translation project started within every people group that needed one by 2025.

 

So they went to work-- retooling processes, procedures, and relationships. They are now on target to reach their goal by 2038, cutting off 112 years off their time table!

 

What's the lesson for us?  Perhaps we also need to be dissatisfied with our current rate of speed  and embark on a similar journey to see how we can hasten the day when every person from every tribe and tongue has access to hearing about Jesus. And as for us who live in Orange County, this means answering a call to reach out neighbors with the incredible good news of Jesus, and fueled by the idea that people  having no access to this message is... simply unacceptable.